We’re in for warming. Zero-carbon helpless against climate change inertia

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Climate change Mckinsey report
Climate change Mckinsey.com

We’re in for warming. Zero-carbon helpless against climate change inertia

Climate change Mckinsey report
Climate change Mckinsey.com
Climate change is here to stay, a new Mckinsey report says. At least for as long as the geophysical machinery of our home planet will throw back at us everything we have been burying in it for very, very long.
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It’s here to stay, says a new Mckinsey report on climate change: “Further warming is “locked in” for the next decade because of physical inertia in the geophysical system.” Only zero-carbon can stop the further increase of the temperature, it says. Yes, but since zero-carbon is not preventing the climate change inertia, the warming will continue bringing the effects of our ages-old carbon footprint back to us for a little longer than forever.

Now, the latter was my layman addition. I am certainly not an expert, nor am I being cynical about something changing our small world along the lines of those morose dystopias Netflixed at most of us in recent years. My “hope” is, though, it’s not just me who knows too little about the geophysical systems. Knowing too little about a threat, perhaps of a deadly kind, is not cool, of course.

The real hope is that we will not be “locked in” our current (mis-)understanding what is going on with our climate and the planet, and some brainy climate researchers will unveil the full-blown big picture of what’s going on.

Because something tells me there is something much bigger about it, which cannot be just stopped by zero-carbon. Well, having said that, I do see the immediate benefit of not being exposed to tonnes of stink and dust on the street. I am just not convinced it’s enough. Anyway, the fact is that we are in for warming and change in all walks of life. Even those we might expect to be least affected.